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The US Government and World Vision partner to help communities tackle drought in Kenya

By Martin Muluka, Emergency Communications Specialist, World Vision Kenya

While the ongoing drought in parts of Kenya continues to take its toll on communities, a group of farmers in the country’s coastal region are experiencing bumper harvests due to adopting drought resistant farming techniques that have cushioned them from the effects of drought.

This is thanks to the projects that World Vision has been implementing with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in the area.

These projects are helping communities to cope effectively with the drought through access to water, food, nutrition supplements and training on climate-smart agricultural techniques.

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Acting US Ambassador (Chargé d’Affaires) in Kenya interacts with Neema, a beneficiary of projects funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by World Vision, which are helping affected communities to get access to water, food and nutrition supplements. ©World Vision Photo/Martin Muluka.

 

Eric Kneedler, the Acting US Ambassador (Chargé d’Affaires) in Kenya noted that his government will continue to support Kenya to address the problems caused by the ongoing drought in the country.

“I know that this drought has really affected you and that these are hard times for most of you. Nevertheless, I would like to assure you that as the US government, we are here to support you and help you fight this drought,” he said during a recent a site visit to one of World Vision’s emergency response projects, funded through the USAID Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance in Kilifi County, Kenya.

As part of the visit, Kneedler interacted with various beneficiaries of the project who are food secure and healthy, amid the prolonged drought in Kenya, thanks to the support of World Vision and the US government through the USAID.

 

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The United States Government will continue supporting Kenya to address the problems affecting communities.©World Vision Photo/Martin Muluka.

 

As part of the visit, Kneedler interacted with various beneficiaries of the project who are food secure and healthy, amid the prolonged drought in Kenya, thanks to the support of World Vision and the US government through the USAID,

“I used to practice rain-fed agriculture. Food production was unreliable and dependent on the weather pattern which has changed greatly, making rainy seasons to be unpredictable. Through our farmers group called Tupendane, I am now food secure mainly because of the training on climate-smart agriculture and the micro-irrigation kits that we received from World Vision through the support of USAID,” said Neema, a beneficiary of the Kenya Integrated Emergency Response Project.

She adds, “I farm tomatoes, vegetables, bananas and maize that provide my family with enough food and I sell the rest to the community. I have learnt how to save and do table banking through World Vision’s Savings For Transformation (S4T) model. Before this intervention, I used to save about KSh.500 weekly but now I save between KSh.800 to KSh.1000 weekly. “

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Success stories like Neema’s are at the heart of World Vision's mission, vision and mandate. Lilian Dodzo, the National Director for World Vision Kenya samples fresh produce from a farm set up with support from World Vision ©World Vision Photo/Martin Muluka.

 

“I used to practice rain-fed agriculture. Food production was unreliable and dependent on the weather pattern which has changed greatly, making rainy seasons to be unpredictable. Through our farmers group called Tupendane, I am now food secure mainly because of the training on climate-smart agriculture and the micro-irrigation kits that we received from World Vision through the support of USAID,” said Neema, a beneficiary of the Kenya Integrated Emergency Response Project in Kilifi County.

She adds, “I farm tomatoes, vegetables, bananas and maize that provide my family with enough food and I sell the rest to the community. I have learnt how to save and do table banking through World Vision’s Savings For Transformation (S4T) model. Before this intervention, I used to save about KSh.500 weekly but now I save between KSh.800 to KSh.1000 weekly. “

Lilian Dodzo the National Director of World Vision Kenya noted that success stories like Neema’s are at the heart of World Vision’s mission, vision and mandate.

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As a result of food security, women and children are enjoying lives thanks to the strong partnership between USAID, World Vision and communities.©World Vision Photo/Martin Muluka.

 

“It is good to see that women and children are enjoying lives as a result of improved nutrition, increased access to safe water and food security. We sincerely thank the US government for their continuous commitment to transform communities and save lives. Moreover, We appreciate the trust they have in World Vision which is implementing various development projects funded by USAID,” she said.

*Featured photo at the top: World Vision staff pose for a photo with Eric Kneedler,, Acting US Ambassador (Chargé d’Affaires) in Kenya.

*Below: Photo gallery of the visit by Eric Kneedler, Acting US Ambassador (Chargé d’Affaires) in Kenya, to World Vision.